Common Mistakes

This is a list of some of the most common mistakes made by parents, athletes and coaches. For more in-depth information and understanding, read some of the blogs listed in blue in the right-hand column.

 

 

“We don’t know much about prep school, but we know we’re not interested”

  • Listen first to what prep school offers. There’s a great chance you’re going to be surprised by what you hear. You can always say no after listening.

 

“We think we know about prep school and we’re not interested”

  • Forget what you’ve heard or read and get accurate information about the big picture. Again, there’s a great chance you’re going to be surprised by what you hear. You can always say no after listening.

 

We don’t need help finding a prep school. We can do it ourselves”

  • It’s not a question of finding a school. It’s about finding the right one.

 

“We can save money by finding a school ourselves”

  • One of the biggest mistakes made
  • You’ve got it backwards. It’ll cost you money to do it yourself, not save you money.
    • You’ll spend $5,000 – $15,000 more on school when you do it yourself. Think about that.

 

“I’m a good student. I don’t need prep school.”

  • The irony of this statement is overwhelming. The best academic schools in the country for students ages 13-19 are prep schools.

 

“We have to sacrifice athletics or academics. There are no schools that are great at both”

  • Some schools are great at both, but you have to know where to look

 

“I already have D1 offers. I don’t need prep school.”

    • What’s your goal? Is it just to get offers, or do you want to have a great college career? Prep school for those who hold offers is about getting the most out of your college career by leveraging those offers.

 

“We can’t afford prep school”

  • Too many people who could afford it dismiss it before looking into it.
    • For some, it will cost less than their current school, and that includes those attending public high school.

 

“Public high school is free”

  • Not true. It’s costs $3,000 – $6,000 per year to feed, house and transport a teenage athlete who lives at home while attending public high school.
    • This explains why some students attend prep school for less than the cost of public school.

 

“My club coach/family friend is going to hook me up with a prep school”

  • This regularly leads to a false sense of security followed by disappointment and confusion. Club coaches and friends know enough to be dangerous and do not have the power they claim.

 

“My player is already getting a lot of recruiting interest. We don’t need to consider prep school”

  • This is a statement of ignorance and insecurity, and is unacceptable coming from someone in a leadership position

 

“I’m going to walk-on instead of doing a PG year. I don’t need prep school”

  • This one is almost laughable. See blog in “Post-Graduate Year” category for complete analysis and explanation.

 

“A redshirt year is the same as a PG year”

  • It’s not, and it’s not even close. A PG year is a much better choice.

 

” Doing a PG year is the same as repeating my junior year. They both get me an extra year”

  • No, it’s not the same. Repeating your junior year is a much better choice and greatly increases the chances of reaching your goals.

 

“Parents who have kids playing at prep schools told us our child’s not good enough to play there”

  • It’s too big a decision to rely on those don’t know as much as they think. Get the facts.

 

“Colleges coaches know a lot about prep school”

  • Most don’t, you just think they do. Even those who do don’t know as much as you or they think.

 

“College coaches are telling me I don’t need prep school”

  • They are biased and are likely telling you what’s best for them, not you. They know prep school will benefit you, not them.

 

“I’m a college coach. I don’t need any help with the prep school process for my child”

  • The statistics clearly indicate otherwise

 

“Prep school is for kids who have graduated from high school”

  • No, prep school is for students in grades 6-12, in addition to a PG year

 

“I’ll wait until after my senior season. If I don’t have the offers I want by then, I’ll look into prep school”

  • If you do, it will be too late. The spots and financial aid will already be handed out.

 

“Prep school is for kids who don’t have scholarship offers”

  • Not true. Many kids with offers still opt for prep school. It’s true for seniors and underclassmen. When you know the facts, the logic is very sound and undeniable.

 

“I’m not sure this kid is a D1 athlete, well maybe a low D1 like a Patriot or Ivy”

  • Do the research. Year after year these leagues are ranked in the middle of D1, ahead of many scholarship leagues.

 

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